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ISSUES CONTENTS LIST
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1 - Volume One Issue One (May / June 2000)

 Special Report: The Eighth Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists

Cover Feature: Eternity of Princes Revealed Finding out about the Lost Tomb, KV5

Cover Feature: The Mummy Detectives: How DNA analysis is shedding light on hidden mummy secrets

Cover Feature: The Cairo Museum - Wonderful Things!

Cracking Codes: The Rosetta Stone and Decipherment

People of Ancient Egypt: interesting times for a priest in the Temple of Amun

Exhibition Previews and Reviews: The British Museum and Eton College

 

2 - Volume One Issue Two (July/Aug 2000)

Undersea Cities

Pharoahs of the Sun - As the "Pharaohs of the Sun" exhibition continues its successful progress, we bring you a report on its Boston sojourn.

Ramesses the Great

Finding Pharaoh: The Discovery of the Royal Caches of Mummies at Thebes

Ancient Temples

Travellers Tales

The British Museum: A Wealth of Knowledge

 

3 - Volume One Issue Three (Sept/Oct 2000)

King Djoser

Changing Times, Ancient Values - modern life in Thebes

Valley of the Kings

Plumbing Secrets of the Sphinx

Temple of Horus at Edfu

Egyptian Elegance - Mount Stuart House in Scotland

Travellers Tales

 

4 - Volume One Issue Four (Nov/Dec 2000)

Desert Preserves Ancestors

Science v Archaeology : Bahareya's "Golden Mummies" Come Under Fire

Lesson of Bahareya

Myth and Ritual in the Temple of Horus at Edfu

An Early Fascination with Embalming

Howard Carter

 

5 - Volume One Issue Five (Jan/Feb 2001)

Special Report : “Scorpion” plaque might give clues to Egypt’s earliest history

Old Kingdom

The Naming of Kings

Future Moves: The Egyptian Museum, Berlin

“Heaven and Hell” at National Museums of Scotland

 

6 - Volume One Issue Six (April/May 2001)

Cleopatra - Queen of Egypt

Amelia Edwards - her vision for Egyptology

Egyptology in Liverpool

Luxor

Ancient Egyptian cartographers

Berlin and Glasgow museum exhibitions

 

7 - Volume Two Issue One (June/July 2001)

Nine Measures of Magic part 1 - The importance of Heka to Ancient Egypt

Mapping the Afterlife

Heraklieon statue

Luxor Mummification Museum - interview with the Director

Louvre Egyptian galleries

 

8 - Volume Two Issue Two (Aug/Sept 2001)

Nine Measures of Magic Part 2: The role of the Magicican in Egyptian society

Interesting Times for Neb Re - The life of a military overseer

Nubian burials

Replica ancient musical instruments

Temple of Debod in Spain

 

9 - Volume Two Issue Three (Nov/Dec 2001)

SOLD OUT - available as free PDF

Nine Measures of Magic Part 3: 'Overthrowing Apophis': Egyptian Ritual in Practice.

Heka at the Louvre - Egyptian magic and ritual

The Amarna Heresy conference

Cleopatra portrayed on film

Music of Ancient Egypt

Leiden Egyptology collection

 

10 - Volume Two Issue Four (Jan/Feb 2002):

Education Special Feature

Antelopes in ancient Egypt

Walking with the Egyptologists

The Amarna Heresy conference

L'Orient de Saladin exhibition

 

11 - Volume Two Issue Five (March/April 2002):

Egyptian humour

Education Special Feature part 2

The Pharaoh Hound

El Kab graffiti

The Treasures of Kingston Lacy

City of the Aten

 

12 - Volume Two Issue Six (May/June 2002):

Hatshepsut: Egypt's female Pharaoh

The Red Chapel of Hatshepsut and Thutmose

The Pyramid at Meidum

The Wells of Tell Abqa'in

Amenhotep III's mortuary temple

 

13 - Volume Three Issue One (July/Aug 2002):

New tomb found

Birds of Ancient Egypt

Aardvarks to otters: ancient Egypt's unusual fauna

Emeralds from the edge

Pharaoh's artists: Deir el Medina and the Valley of the Kings

 

14 - Volume Three Issue Two (Sept/Oct 2002):

The Plumage of the Gods - Bird life along the ancient Nile

Woodworking in ancient Egypt part 1

Colloquium report

The West Bank at Luxor

The pyramid site of Dahshur

 

15 - Volume Three Issue Three (Nov/Dec 2002):

Monstrous images - Mythical Monsters in ancient Egyptian art

Woodworking in Ancient Egypt part 2

Cairo Museum centenary

The restoration of the Hanging Church

The Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum: an oasis in California

Exhibition: Beautes d'Egypt flourish in Belgium

 

16 - Volume Three Issue Four (Jan/Feb 2003):

Napoleon's "Savants" part 1

The forgotten Salle Theodore M. Davis

Woodworking in ancient Egypt part 3

Victorian photographer Francis Frith

Happy Birthday to Egyptian Museum of Antiquities

 

17 - Volume Three Issue Five (Mar/Apr 2003):

Napoleon's "Savants" part 2

Ancient Egyptian art collections in America

CRE IV symposium

Camels

Poetry

The Winter Palace in Luxor

Egyptian art exhibitions in USA museums

 

18 - Volume Three Issue Six (May/June 2003:

Spellbound: Charming the Snake & the Scorpion

The Wilbour Library of Egyptology

Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen part 1

Egypt-inspired cartoons

The Wilbour library

Shabtis exhibition

 

19 - Volume Four Issue One (July/Aug 2003):

"Pompey's Pillar" in Alexandria

Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen part 2

More Egypt-inspired cartoons

Perilous descent: The Hall of the Mountain Kings

Brooklyn Museum of Art - Egypt Reborn permanent display

A Curator's guide to the Louvre

Tutankhamun's Wardrobe

 

20 - Volume Four Issue Two (Oct/Nov 2003):

Egyptian themed crypts in Paris

Egyptian sacred cats part 1

Lepsius' inscription on the Great Pyramid

Conference special report

Curator' Choice: The Detroit Institute of Art

 

21 - Volume Four Issue Three (Dec 2003/Jan 2004):

Inspired by Egypt: In the footsteps of Hans Winckler: the origins of ancient Egypt - New light on the origins of ancient Egypt results from the cumulated work of travellers to the Eastern Desert in the past 50 years. Mike and Maggie Morrow outline some of these ideas.

Exploring Khufu’s Great Pyramid - The Great Pyramid has drawn explorers and investigators through the ages. Their motivation varied, but the attraction remains, as Dr Joyce Tyldesley explains.

Without exception, held to be sacred: the Egyptian cat - Part 2 of our cat series concludes, as Joyce Filer investigates cat mummies

The Peacock: rare bird of charm and grace - The flaunting peacock captured the imagination of artists in Egypt, as elsewhere Patrick F. Houlihan tells us.

Daily life objects in ancient Egyptian tombs: behind the myth - Perhaps you associate Egyptian burials with objects of daily life? Wolfram Grajetski takes a surprising new look at an apparently well-known matter.

 

22 - Volume Four Issue Four (Feb/Mar 2004):

The 40 Days Road - Lorraine Chittock travelled the arduous and ancient trade route from Sudan to Egypt the traditional way and her lovely images tell the story.

Venus and the Vamp - Egyptianising elements in French art resulted in some surprising and provocative elements reveals Cathie Bryan.

Technology on the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Boats - Vital to the success of the Nile highway; the technology of boats described by Bob Partridge.

Inspired by Egypt - Lurking in Leeds, a hidden gem photographed by a reader.

Curator’s Choice: The Oriental Institute, Chicago - The choice of Emily Teeter who also tells of an Egyptologist’s unusual (busman’s?) honeymoon.

Porphyry Exhibition - The stone of royalty and religion, an exhibition at the Louvre reviewed by Cathie Bryan

 

23 - Volume Four Issue Five - April/May 2004:

Venus and the Vamp - In the second part of her feature on the Egyptian in French art, Cathie Bryan focuses on the political and mythical aspects that appealed to 19th century taste.

The case of the curious mummies - Super sleuth Joyce Filer dons deerstalker and picks up her magnifying glass as she goes on the trail of some mummies with a peculiar past.

Technology on the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Boats - Developing from their early papyrus boats, the Egyptians became skilled technologists in wooden vessels in later periods as Bob Partridge describes.

John Garstang and the Institute of Archaeology, University of Liverpool - Archaeology and Liverpool have a long-standing relationship, from the early days of the Institute, through the SACOS and its latest incarnation, SACE at Liverpool University. Pat Winker of SACE describes the life of John Garstang in this centenary year.

Egypt's Gold Country - Lorraine Chittock takes us on a promenade through a historic section of Cairo - with everywhere, the glint of gold!

 

24 - Volume Four Issue Six -- June/July 2004

What’s in a name? - AE looks at the problems and inconsistencies in the spelling of Ancient Egyptian names

The Unfinished Obelisk - Geologist Colin Reader visits the site of the Unfinished Obelisk at Aswanto see what evidence is there for the quarrying methods used.

The God’s Wives of Amun. - Aidan Dodson examines the role of "God’s Wife" and at the women who held this position in the New Kingdom and later.

Egyptian Masterpieces: - The statues of Rahotep and Nofret

Crime and Punishment in Ancient Egypt - Joyce Tyldesley examines the evidence for wrong-doing in Ancient Egypt and the subsequent, sometimes harsh, punishments inflicted.

The God Seth - Birgit Schoer examines the history of the worship of the god Seth from the earliest times to his vilification towards the end of Ancient Egyptian history

That wasn’t here last time! - A well known statue in the temple of Karnak presents a new face to the world.

Carter and the Goldsmith - Howard Carter’s link with a Harrogate Jeweller helped to analyse the the gold from Tutankhamun’s tomb. Alison Millerman reveals the story.

"Which Country?" - Mary Carter, David Soper and Mark Walker report from Luxor on what is new and what has changed since their last visit.

 

25 - Volume Five Issue One -- August/September 2004

So you want to know about ... Pyramids - Aidan Dodson looks at the sometimes confusing and daunting number of books on Pyramids. Which are the ones to get if you wish to study the subject?

A new home for the Petrie Museum - Cathie Bryan looks at the ambitious plans to re-house one of the U.K.’s major Egyptology collections.

Ozymandias - Why is a Nineteenth Century poem recited in an ancient temple? Dylan Bickerstaffe investigates and is inspired by the Muse of Poetry.

What Happened at Meidum? - Did the pyramid fall or was it pushed? Tony Judd and Colin Reader examine the evidence.

Recreating a Bracelet of Queen Hetepheres - Roger Pilling, a modern jeweller, sets himself the task of recreating one of the silver bracelets from the Old Kingdom tomb of Queen Hetepheres.

Featured Pharaoh: Sneferu - AE spotlights the Old Kingdom pharaoh, who features in both the Meidum and Hetepheres Bracelet articles.

Fire-stone, Magic Serpents and Butchery Knives - Carolyn Graves-Brown examines the role of flint in Dynastic Egypt.

Mummy: The Inside Story - A major new exhibition at the British Museum uses the latest technology to see what lies beneath the wrappings of a mummy. AE Editor Bob Partridge looks at the research behind the exhibition.

Society News: Southampton Ancient Egypt Society - AE brings news and information about the flourishing Southampton Society.

The Bazaar Experience - Explore the delights and curiosities in the tourist and local Bazaars of Egypt.

 

26 - Volume Five Issue Two -- October/November 2004

Bread and Beer: Cathie Bryan visits a new special exhibition in Belgium.

Ancient Egypt at the Royal Academy in London

Egyptian Masterpieces: The Canopic Shrine of Tutankhamun

Mining for Gold in Ancient Egypt: How did the Ancient Egyptians mine their most precious commodity? Barbara Tratsaert examines the evidence.

A New Look for the Rosetta Stone: Richard Parkinson reports on the new display at the British Museum of its best-known exhibit.

Obelisks in Exile: AE’s Editor tells the story of how, in the Nineteenth Century, several obelisks from Ancient Egypt were moved to places thousands of miles from their original homes.

Papyrus of the "Mistress of the House": An illustrated papyrus translated for the first time. Ayman Wahby Taher reveals the secrets of a papyrus in the John Rylands Library in Manchester.

Sudan: Ancient Treasures: AE looks at a stunning new exhibition at the British Museum, featuring objects loaned from the Sudan National Museum in Khartoum.

Architectural Gems – The White Chapel of Senusret I at Karnak

Backpacking in Egypt: Travelling light and staying in smaller, simple hotels, Gary Gainsbury journeys from Cairo to Aswan, by road, rail and river.

The Gilf Kebir and Gebel Uweinat: Michael Ackroyd explores the awesome landscape and geology of this remote region, and discovers some of the most beautiful rock art to be found anywhere in the world, along with tales of lost oases, hidden treasure, death-defying exploration and Oscar-winning films.

 

27 - Volume Five Issue Three (Dec 2004/Jan 2005)

The Story of the Destruction of Mankind - Joyce Tyldesley tells a tale of the inherently evil nature of mankind in a story which dates to the very beginnings of ancient Egyptian history.

The Head-dress of the Mummy of Rai - Despite being robbed in antiquity, the mummy of the lady Rai reveals evidence of the jewellery which once accompanied her to the grave. Marianne Luban investigates.

Papyrus: Myth and Symbolism - Hilary Wilson looks at the practical and symbolic uses of the papyrus plant in ancient Egypt.

The Amarna Crock of Gold - Alison Millerman finds out how modern excavators benefitted from the exploits of ancient robbers.

Alexander at Siwa - Alexander the Great’s visit to Siwa Oasis was to change his life and the fate of the ancient world. Tony Judd follows Alexander’s footsteps.

Growing Old Disgracefully at Deir el-Medina - What was life like in ancient Egypt for the elderly and how were they regarded and treated by the young? Rosalind Janssen looks at the evidence.

The Great Sphinx of Giza: how old is it? - Colin Reader examines the archaeological and geological evidence to see if it is possible to establish a date for this monument, in the light of publicised claims that it is actually over ten thousand years old.

Archive Image - AE looks at early photographic images of the Sphinx at Giza.

The Anglia and the Ceopatra - How "Cleopatra’s Needle" was towed to the UK.

 

28 - Volume Five Issue Four February/March 2005

Discovering the Lost Half of a Papyrus - Jac. Janssen reunites the separated parts of a papyrus, one half in the British Museum and the other in Amiens in France, and deciphers its text.

So you want to know about ... The Royal Mummies and the Valley of the Kings - Dylan Bickerstaffe helps to identify the most useful and available books and web-sites.

The Egyptian Royal Family - Aidan Dodson gives an overview of the key members of a pharaoh’s family.

Egypt, 1905: a Footnote to History - Mark Trumpour discovers the records of a visit made to Egypt by his grandfather a hundred years ago.

The Opet Festival - The great festival which was held for the first time in the New Kingdom in ancient Thebes still has echoes today. Andrew Hamilton investigates.

The Hidden Collection - Charlotte Booth discovers an Egyptian collection in the Grange Museum in Neasdon, North London.

100 years ago: the discovery of the tomb of Yuya and Thuya - AE Editor, Bob Partridge, looks at what was, at that time, the largest and most valuable archaeological discovery made in the Valley of the Kings.

Inspired by Egypt: Ancient Egypt in Kensington. - AE discovers a modern building influenced by ancient Egypt

Archive Image: Egypt Then and Now - Early and modern photographs of the temple of Karnak.

Ancient Egypt on the Small Screen - AE looks at recent TV documentaries on ancient Egypt.

PHARAON in Paris - Cathie Bryan visits a major exhibition in Paris.

AE supporting Egyptological causes: 2005: The Friends of The Petrie Museum A new initiative by AE.

 

29 - Volume Five Issue Five April/May 2005

Film Review: "Alexander" - Mark Walker reviews the recent major film on Alexander the Great.

Letters from the Desert - Jan Picton reviews Margaret Drower’s new book on the correspondence of Flinders and Hilda Petrie.

The Riddle of the Pyramids - New research on the Great Pyramid and other developments at Giza are revealed by Dr Zahi Hawass.

The Luxor Museum gets bigger and better! - AE visits the major extension to the already excellent Luxor Museum of Ancient Egyptian Art.

Dogs in ancient Egypt - Working dogs, pampered pets or divine beings? Malcolm Hobson investigates.

The Egypt Exploration Society in Nubia - Christopher Naunton delves into the EES archives of the 1930s and 1960s to find out about the lighter side of excavating in Nubia.

The Dubrovnik Mummy - Mary and Alan Carter discover an unusual mummy on their holiday.

Inspired by Egypt: Wafi City, Dubai - Cathie and Tony Bryan visit a new and remarkable shopping complex in Wafi city in Dubai, which features Egyptian-influenced architecture and designs.

The Friends of the Petrie Museum - The latest news from the Petrie.

Stop Press: The initial results of the CT scan on the mummy of Tutankhamun.

 

30 - Volume Five Issue Six June/July 2005

The Thrice-Buried Queen - Dylan Bickerstaffe investigates the story of a Queen re-buried under unusual circumstances.

Digging in a Museum - Wolfram Grajetzki examines the Second Intermediate Period burial of Senebhenaef.

The Island of Elephantine - AE visits the monuments on the Island of Elephantine, a site of strategic importance throughout Egypt’s long history.

"... but where did they live?" - Peter Phillips looks at the most important of places to individuals throughout history – their homes.

The Mummy of Tutankhamun - AE brings you the full report from the Supreme Council of Antiquities, following the recent CT scan of Tutankhamun’s Mummy.

Ancient Egypt on the Small Screen - A review of recent television documentaries on ancient Egypt.

New Lakes and Very Old Bones - AE looks at a new site for touists in the Fayoum, which includes an area where the fossilised skeletons of whales can be seen.

Holiday Competition Results - We give you the answers and name the winners.

Cairo’s oldest and largest mosque: the Mosque of Ibn Tulun - Recently restored, the Ibn Tulun Mosque is a haven for mind, body and spirit in the heart of Old Cairo.

News of the Friends of the Petrie Museum

A Stab in the Back - Joan Rees tells a tale of rivalry between Egyptologist Amelia Edwards and her cousin Matilda Betham-Edwards.

Archive Image - Medinet Habu

 

31 - Volume Six Issue One August/September 2005

The Oriental Museum in Durham - Karen Exell tells how the collection was formed and looks at some of the more important exhibits.

Who were Nefertiti’s Parents? - Marshall Hindley discusses the possible parentage of one of Egypt’s most famous Queens.

Replica Tomb of Thutmose III - Nacho Ares describes the project to create a fullsized replica of the tomb of Thutmose III, soon to be on display in Edinburgh.

Reconstructing the Face of Tutankhamun - A report from the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities on the facial reconstruction of Tutankhamun following the recent CT scan.

Meryetamun at Akhmim - The story of the discovery and restoration of a remarkable colossal statue of Queen Meryetamun, daughter and Great Royal Wife of Rameses II, told by Ayman Wahby Taher.

A river full of water ... but was it safe to drink? - Jo Morris investigates where the ancient Egyptian obtained their drinking water.

Dressing Nefertiti: Ancient Egyptian Costumes on Television. - Egyptology Clothing Consultant Janet Johnstone describes the problems of designing reproductions of ancient costumes for television programmes and films.

Archive Image - Old and new images of the obelisk of King Senuseret I at Heliopolis.

Defending Egypt from Chaos: Rameses III and his Battles - Nicholas Wernick looks at the military campaigns of Rameses III, as detailed in his temple at Medinet Habu, to determine if he was truly one of the great warrior pharaohs.

 

32 - Volume Six Issue Two October/November 2005

Inspired by Egypt - One Egyptian businessman has been so inspired by ancient Egypt that he calls himself Djed-Maat-Ra, and has built himself a temple dedicated to Hathor! – Ayman Wahby Taher interviews him for AE.

You can look, but PLEASE don’t touch! - AE’s Editor warns of the danger to monuments from too many visitors.

Victorian View of Ancient Egypt - John Hannavy looks at the social conventions revealed by the Victorian photograph albums of trips to Egypt.

The Temple of Gerf Hussein - Martin Davies describes the history of this temple, now partially reconstructed at New Kalabsha.

Rameses II at the Ramesseum and in the British Museum - Photographic skill and modern computer software allow Guy de Bédoyère to "re-unite" the two parts of a famous statue.

Tales of the Crypts - Following her investigation of the Egyptianising monuments in a Parisian cemetery, Cathie Bryan visits two London cemeteries.

The Identity of the King and the Sun God - Chris O’Kane finds links between the movements of the stars and planets and ancient Egyptian mythology.

The (Royal) Mummy Returns but is he Rameses I? - Dylan Bickerstaffe analyses the evidence.

Improved Facilities in the Valley of the Kings - Marshall Hindley reports on proposed changes that could make visits to the Valley more pleasant for everyone as well as helping to protect the tombs from increasing numbers of tourists.

 

33 - Volume Six Issue Three December 2005 / January 2006

Replicating an Egyptian Relief - Annemarie La Pensée describes how an important artifact from the World Museum Liverpool was replicated, at the request of Egypt’s SCA, using the latest technology.

Ancient Egyptian Medicine - Ancient Egyptian literature contains some surprisingly modern diagnoses and treatments for illnesses, as Dr George M. Burden discovered.

Made in Egypt - Zaghloul Ibrahim Mohamed is interviewed by Ayman Wahby Taher about his work re-creating replicas of ancient Egyptian masterpieces.

A Lion of Amenhotep III - AE investigates a lion at the Citadel in Cairo, and compares it with other well-known similar sculptures carved in the reign of the great pharaoh.

Black Athena - Who is or was "Black Athena"? Janet Robinson gives some anwers, and sees the concept as opening up the world of ancient Egypt to many who felt excluded in the past.

Ancient Egypt on the Small Screen - The BBC’s new series on ancient Egypt reviewed by AE’s Editor, who finds a great deal to criticise.

The Temple of Ptah at Karnak - Charlotte Booth gives readers a guided tour of this rarely-visited corner of the Karnak site.

Mummies at the Movies - Mark Walker examines the influence of ancient Egypt, especially the modern fascination with mummies, on the fantasy world of the Big Screen.

The Baron’s Palace - AE tells the story of one of Cairo’s most unusual landmarks.

Sphinx - Bob Partridge looks at some of the many examples of sphinxes in Egypt.

 

34 - Volume Six Issue Four February/March 2006

Featured Pharaoh: Neferhotep I - Following the recent discovery of a statue of Neferhotep I at Karnak, Wolfram Grajetzki examines the reign of this little-known ruler.

The Friends of Nekhen - The first of AE’s regular articles in support of excavations at Hierakonpolis. This report covers Pre-dynastic houses and temples.

Past Articles and News Revisited - AE looks again at some of the articles from recent issues, with updates covering the latest news and developments.

Ancient Egypt in Madrid - Cathy Brian reviews the Egyptian collection in the National Archaeological Museum and a complete Nubian Temple, both in the Spanish capital.

Ancient Egypt on the Small Screen - A review of recent British TV programmes about ancient Egypt.

Granite? Gneiss? Greywacke? ... What stone is that? - Geologist Birgit Schoer identifies some of the types of rock used in Egyptian sculpture and building.

Archive Image: Egypt Then and Now - The Colossi of Memnon in the last inundation of the Nile.

The Cleaning of "Cleopatra’s Needle" in London - A report on the cleaning and current condition of the obelisk of Thutmose III, written by Iain McLean, the Director of the specialist cleaning company, Antique Bronze Ltd.

 

35 - Volume Six Issue Five April/May 2006

A “New” tomb in the valley of the Kings - AE reports on the newly-discovered tomb in the Valley of the Kings, containing seven coffins and many storage jars. How was the tomb found and who could the occupants be?

Sinful Barbarians and Part-Time Legionaries - The area surrounding the Temple of Isis at Philae was the scene of some fierce fighting in the fifth century AD. Ross Cowan tells the story.

Featured Pharaoh: The God’s Father Ay - Ay held senior positions in the court through the reigns of Amenhotep III, Akhenaten and Tutankhamun, before he himself became Pharaoh. Marshall Hindley examines the evidence.

Photo Feature: the Anubis Chapel in the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut - AE looks at the surviving decoration in this well-preserved Chapel in the much-visited temple at Deir el Bahri.

Did the ancient Egyptians ever reach Malta? - The ancient Egyptians had a lucrative trade with Eastern Mediterranean nations and islands. Anton Mifsud and Marta Farrugia look at evidence for their reaching as far as Malta.

The Friends of Nekhen - In the second of her regular articles, Renée Friedman looks at the discoveries made in the cemeteries of Hierakonpolis, which have revealed the earliest attempts in Egypt at mummification and some remarkable grave goods.

 

36 - Volume Six Issue Six June/July 2006

Ancient Egyptian Wine - New investigations on the residue in wine jars found in the Tomb of Tutankhamun have revealed some of the the ancient vintner’s secrets. Maria Gausch Jane investigates.

Belzoni’s Sarcophagi - Explorer and adventurer Giovanni Belzoni was an avid collector of Egyptian Antiquities at the beginning of the nineteenth century; size was no object! Dylan Bickerstaffe investigates.

Friends of Nekhen News - Renée Friedman reports on the work to conserve one of the largest and oldest mud-brick buildings from ancient Egypt to survive at Hierakonpolis.

The New Tomb in the Valley of the Kings - An update from Roxanne Wilson, a member of the excavation team, on the recent discovery and the progress made in clearing the small chamber.

Ancient Egypt in Zagreb - Mladen Tomorad and Igor Uranic tell readers about the collections of the Archaeological Museum of Zagreb in Croatia.

Visiting Middle Egypt - AE reader Anne Eglintine tells how a she arranged to visit Amarna and other Middle Egyptian sites by travelling from Luxor independently.

Byzantine Egypt - Sean McLachlan tells how ancient Egyptian ideas are reflected in early Christianity in Egypt, which was a melting-pot of ideas and beliefs in the Late Roman and Byzantine periods.

 

37 - Volume Seven Issue One August/September 2006

News from Egypt - Egypt Correspondent Ayman Wahby Taher on the lastest news from Egypt. Included in this issue is the major discovery of a hoard of gold cartouches bearing the name of Thutmose III in the Temple of Karnak, and news of the project to lower the ground water in and around the temple of Karnak and Luxor.

Hedgehogs in ancient Egyptian art - Magda van Ryneveld explains why the humble hedgehog features so often in ancient Egyptian art.

Menkaura’s anthropid coffin - A wooden coffin found in the pyramid of Menkaura bears the king’s name. But was it really his? Paul Boughton investigates.

Harvesting a pharaoh - An unexpected discovery in the Eighteenth Dynasty tomb of Anen at Thebes brought a lost painting back to life. Lyla Pinch-Brock describes how.

Clothing culture: dress in Egypt in the first millennium AD - Frances Pritchard reports on a new exhibition at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester.

The New Tomb in the Valley of the Kings - Another update from Roxanne Wilson, a member of the excavation team, on the recent discovery and the progress made in clearing the small chamber.

Vivant Denon’s "mysterious cache" - Marriane Luban reports on the activities of one of the first collectors of Egyptian antiquities, at the end of the eighteenth century.

Friends of Nekhen News - Renée Friedman looks at the decorated tombs at Hierakonpolis, whose inscriptions and decoration can tell us so much about life in the city in Dynastic times.

Two Sphinxes of Amenhotep III in St Petersburg

Per Mesut - for younger readers

 

38 - Volume Seven Issue Two October/November 2006

News from Egypt - The magazine’s Egypt Correspondent brings the latest news from Egypt which includes the uncovering of the complete Neferhotep I double statue at Karnak, other finds and discoveries in the temple of Karnak and on the West Bank at Luxor and a full report on Egypt’s newest museum, the Imhotep Museum at Saqqara

Tomb KV 63 in the Valley of the Kings - The last of a total of four special reports on the tomb, which sees the small chamber finally cleared of all the objects it contained.

Another New tomb in the valley of the Kings? - Nicholas Reeves explains what some important and revealing radar images taken in the heart of the valley might mean. Could it be another new tomb?

The Ancient Stones Speak - Hieroglyph teacher Pam Scott gives an introduction to reading and understanding the hieroglyphic inscriptions. This is the first in a three part series of articles which will enable beginners to make some sense of the ancient script.

Royal Mummies on view in the Egyptian Museum - A brief report on the opening of the second mummy room in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

Images of the Rekhyt from ancient Egypt - Kenneth Griffin looks at the many images of the lapwing which features in ancient Egyptian art for a period of over three thousand years. Was it just a representation of a bird, or was there much more to it?

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at pomegranates.

Friends of Nekhen News - The fifth of the reports on the important and revealing work being done at Hierakonpolis. This article looks at the Nubians in Hierakonpolis and the evidence found of their lives there.

 

39 - Volume Seven Issue Three December 2006 / January 2007

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Egypt, including the moving of the Rameses II statue.

The Writing is on the Wall ... but should it be? AE reveals the growing problem of modern graffiti at some of the most important archeological sites in Egypt.

Photo Feature: more on the Imhotep Museum at Saqqara - AE presents unique photographs of some of the stunning exhibits at the new museum at Saqqara.

Dying to be Egyptian - Elisabeth Kerner looks at some of the lesser-known cemeteries in London, with their “Egyptianising” architecture.

The Tomb of Harwa at Thebes - Chris Naunton writes about the excavations and finds in one of the largest private tombs (dating to the Twenty-sixth Dynasty) in the Theban Necropolis.

Ancient Egyptian Technology - Denys Stocks, in the first of three articles, reveals how the ancient Egyptians cut and carved the hardest of stones for their monuments and statues.

Mary Chubb: Writer and Archaeologist - A brief biography by Elizabeth Griesman.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at baskets..

Friends of Nekhen News - Renée Friedman looks at the many and varied finds from the ancient city of Hierakonpolis and what they reveal about the inhabitants.

 

40 - Volume Seven Issue Four February/March 2007

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Egypt, including changes in the Luxor Museum and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Don’t forget to pack the Piano! - AE looks at how the early visitors to Egypt travelled the river Nile in style, on board sailing boats known as dahabeeyahs, and how you can still do so today.

A Woman of the Gilf - Janet Robinson travels to the Gilf Kebir in the south of Egypt and visits a newly-discovered cave full of ancient rock art.

A Tomb with Latitude? - John Wall asks if the ancient Egyptians knew the size of the earth and sited their buildings accordingly (and gives us his answer).

Egypt and the Bible - The ancient history of Egypt and the Holy Land are closely intertwined. Michael Tunnicliffe looks to see if there is archaeological proof for Biblical events

A figure from the Rider Haggard Collection - Fiona Sheales re-discovers a forgotten wooden figure that once belonged to the great writer.

Inspired by Egypt - Painting like an Egyptian, by Tony North.

The Ancient Stones Speak - Pam Scott explains how to read royal names, in the second of her articles on Hieroglyphs

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the first in a series of articles, Professor Anthony Mills introduces the Oasis and the work of the Dakhleh Oasis Project.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at scarabs.

 

41 - Volume Seven Issue Five April/May 2007

Through a Glass, Clearly - Alan L. Jeffreys looks at an unusual and impressive display in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

Egypt in Dubai - Cathie Bryan looks at some of the many new Egyptian-style buildings that have been built in Wafi City in Dubai.

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the second in a series of articles, Dr. Peter Sheldrick looks at the physical remains of the ancient inhabitants of the Oasis.

The Temple of Khonsu at Karnak - Charlotte Booth takes us on a tour of the well-preserved small temple, showing how it demonstrates a power-shift from the Pharaoh to the Priests of Amun.

An unwrapped mummified head in the Hancock Museum - Gill Scott tells how a male mummified head has recently been conserved.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from around Egypt, including exciting discoveries in the major new excavation of the Avenue of Sphinxes between the temples of Luxor and Karnak.

Technology Innovators of Ancient Egypt - In the second of his series of articles, Denys Stocks looks at the technology of the great pyramid-building age of ancient Egypt, the Old Kingdom.

A Pilgrimage to Abydos - Blair Wilkins visits Abydos and a special grave there.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at grain.

 

42 - Volume Seven Issue Six June/July 2007

Anticipating Tutankhamun - An update on information about the forthcoming “Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs” Exhibition in London later in the year.

Cairo a Century Ago - Sigrid M. van Roode looks at how the city of Cairo became oriented towards Europe in the nineteenth century, and at surviving buildings from that time.

The Great Royal Wives from Akhmim - Marta Farrugia and Anton Mifsud ask how a small town in Middle Egypt produced some of the greatest Great Royal Wives of the New Kingdom.

The Ancient Stones Speak: Part Three - Pam Scott, in her third and final article on hieroglyphs, explains how to read inscriptions found on funerary objects.

A Woman of Old Akhmim - Jonathan Elias, Carter Lupton and Heather Gill-Robinson investigate a mummy from Akhmim.

A Visit to Serabit el Khadim - Stewart White visits an important site in the Sinai Peninsula, sacred to the goddess Hathor.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from around Egypt, including exciting discoveries in the necropolis of Saqqara.

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the third of a series of articles on the Project, Jennifer Smith shows how the geology of the Oasis reflects huge climate changes over the millennia.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at bread.

 

43 - Volume Eight Issue One August/September 2007

Statues of Akhenaten - AE looks at the many enigmatic colossal statues of Akhenaten surviving from his temple to the Aten at Karnak.

Ancient Egyptian Technology - In his third and final article on ancient technology, Denys Stocks shows how the ancient Egyptians had mass-production techniques for cutting and carving the hardest of stones.

Queen Tiye - Marshall Hindley recounts the life and times of the Great Royal Wife of King Amenhotep III.

New views of Luxor temple - AE reports on the recent civil engineering works,new excavations and conservation work at Luxor.

Anticipating Tutankhamun - An update on information about the forthcoming “Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs” Exhibition in London later this year.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from around Egypt, including exciting discoveries in and around the temples of Karnak.

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the fourth of a series of articles on the Project, Dr. Colin Hope tells readers about the Roman Period village of Kellis, located at the heart of the Oasis.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at ancient Egyptian picnics.

 

44 - Volume Eight Issue Two October/November 2007

The Mummy of Hatshepsut identified - Ayman Wahby Taher reports on how a previously unidentified mummy is now known to be Hatshepsut.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from around Egypt, including more exciting discoveries in Middle Egypt and at Luxor.

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the fifth of a series of articles on the Project, Dr. Colin Hope looks at the town of Mut el-Kharab, located at the heart of the Oasis.

Mummies Unwrapped - Arabella Cecil looks at the challenges of recreating and filming ancient Egypt for the BIG screen.

Meeting Tutankhamun - Dr. Zahi Hawass meets Tutankhamun and gives some background to the forthcoming exhibition Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs.

The Tutankhamun Record - Jaromir Malek reveals how Howard Carter tackled the difficult task of recording the clearance of the tomb of the king.

The Egyptian Stones of the Washington Monument - John Lockwood discovers an ancient Egyptian block of stone built into the famous monument.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at mice.

 

45- Volume Eight Issue Three December 2007 / January 2008

Where we are with Amarna - Barry Kemp anticipates a series of articles on Amarna that will appear in AE next year.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from around Egypt.

The Gayer Anderson Cat - Neal Spencer reveals the secrets of one of the British Museum’s best known Egyptian antiquities.

Meeting the Boy King - Charlotte Booth looks at some of the objects from the Tomb of Tutankhamun and what they tell us about the life of the young king.

The Mosque in Luxor Temple - Ayman Wahby Taher describes the uncovering of important ancient reliefs, dating to Rameses II, within the Mosque. Plus news from Qurna.

The Real Cleopatra’s Needle - Stephanie Roberts tells the story of how an obelisk from Philae ended up in the gardens of a stately home in Dorset. Plus news of some re-discovered ostraca.

Maat: An Ancient Morality Check - Beth Asbury relates how Maat was the fundamental force that held the universe together and reflected the ancient Egyptians’ sense of right and wrong.

An Egyptianising Elephant House - visited in Antwerp by Peter Phillips.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at colour.

 

46 - Volume Eight Issue Four February/March 2008

The KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology - Students of the Centre, which is based at the University of Manchester in the UK, report on aspects of their research.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher, with the latest news from around Egypt, including the moving and placing on display of the mummy of Tutankhamun, and yet more discoveries at Karnak.

Tutankhamun and the Royal Crowns of Egypt - AE reviews the various styles of royal crown, as illustrated by the ushabti figures and statuettes from the King’s tomb.

Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs - In a special photo feature,AE looks at some of the stunning objects in the Exhibition in London.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp describes Amarna’s genesis in the first of a series of articles on work at Amarna, the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti.

The Dakhleh Oasis Project - In the last of a series of articles, Fred Leemhuis tells readers about discoveries and conservation work being done in the old town of Qasr Dakhleh.

An Egyptianising building at Giza - King Farouk’s Rest House.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at light.

 

47 - Volume Eight Issue Five April/May 2008

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher, with the latest news from around Egypt, including the cleaning of the ceiling , and discoveries at Karnak.

The funerary goods of Henutmer - Ingeborg Waanders lists the few known objects from this Theban burial, now scattered in museums and private collections world-wide.

Tutankhamun in London and Vienna - AE looks at a few of the objects now on display in the two different Tutankhamun-related exhibitions.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp describes the people of Amarna in the second of a series of articles on work at Amarna, the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti.

A Kushite Statue in Southampton - Hilary Wilson tells how an important statue was discovered in a museum store room; Mark Walker investigates its possible connection with Gordon of Khaertoum.

The Search for Imhotep - Ian Mathieson describes how the latest technology has revealed areas at Saqqara where the Tomb of Imhotep might possibly be found.

Howard Carter's Bird Paintings - revealed by Jaromir Malek.

Revealing the Secrets of Mummies - Vicky Gashe reveals how science is helping us to understand how people lived in ancient Eypt.

Per Mesut: For younger readers - This issue Hilary Wilson looks at ladders.

 

48 - Volume Eight Issue Six June/July 2008

Archive Image - A reader of AE discovers a postcard dating to the time of the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb.

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher, with the latest news from around Egypt – new discoveries in Luxor and Aswan and exhibitions in Aswan and Cairo.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - In this edition, Hilary Wilson looks at stools and chairs.

Recent explorations in the Abusir Pyramid Field - Professor Miroslav Verner gives an account of over forty years of work at the Old Kingdom pyramid field of Abusir, and of the many important discoveries made there more recently.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp describes the development of the City of Amarna in the third of a series of articles on the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti.

Ancient Egyptian Eye Paint - Was ancient eye paint used for medicinal, ritual or cosmetic reasons? Chris Humber investigates.

Sherds, Clay and Clean Water - Henning Franzmeier looks at ancient Egyptian well technology.

Egyptianising Architecture in Ohio - Earl L. Ertman describes some monuments in Akron, Ohio, U.S.A.

Ancient Egyptian Masterpieces - AE looks at the Statue of Khafra in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

 

49 - Volume Nine Issue One August/September 2008

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher, with the latest news from around Egypt – new discoveries and reports from Middle Egypt, Luxor and Cairo.

More News from Egypt - A report from AE’s Editors with yet more news from Luxor and from the Western Desert Oases.

The Domain of the Cat-Goddess, Bastet - Daniela Rosenow looks at the substantial remains in and around the Great Temple of Bubastis, sacred to Bastet, in the Delta city that still bears her name, Tell Basta.

The Gardeners of Amun - AE looks at a new exhibition featuring the burial equipment of families of gardeners from Thebes.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp in the fourth of a series of articles on the city, looks at Amarna as a workshop.

Tutankhamun and the World of the Pharoahs - A photo. report by Nacho Ares and María Belci on the Vienna exhibition.

Pharaonic Renaissance - Igor Uranic looks at an exhibition on Late Period art in Zagreb and Budapest.

Servant of the Deep - Paul Boughton discovers a ushabti figure that survived the sinking of the Titanic.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - In this edition, Hilary Wilson looks at stools and chairs.

 

50 - Volume Nine Issue Two October/November 2008

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Egypt – new discoveries and reports from Taposiris Magna, Saqqara and Luxor.

Pharaoh’s Gold - Geologist and Egyptologist, Colin Reader, looks at the ancient Egyptian methods of finding and mining gold.

A Tale of Two Heads ... finds out how and why two heads of statues of Amenhotep III in the British Museum have been replicated, in order to send copies back to Egypt.

The Use of Leopard Skin in Ancient Egypt - Magda van Ryneveld describes the use of the pelt from leopards, which adorned the priests, nobility and kings of Egypt.

Tutankhamun’s Murder: Case Reopened? - Dr. David Counsell examines the known evidence and concludes that still more tests and studies are needed before the case for murder can be dismissed.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at Hawk Gods.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp, in the fifth of a series of articles, asks if the cult of the Aten was a religion for all.

 

51 - Volume Nine Issue Three December 2008 / January 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest new discoveries and reports from around Egypt.

The Lost Sarcophagus - Paul Boughton tells how the sarcophagus of Menkaura, from his pyramid at Giza, was lost at sea on the way to England, and the plans to recover it.

The Stela of Bakenkhonsu - Find out how the text on this recently-discovered stela has increased our knowledge of one period of Egyptian history.

Timekeeping in Ancient Egypt - How did the ancient Egyptians keep track of time? Nicholas Wernick investigates.

The Tomb Paintings of Nebamun in the British Museum - Richard Parkinson tells how these fabulous paintings have been conserved, ready for their re-display in a new gallery at the British Museum.

Ur Sunu - An Italian exhibition about ancient Egyptian medicine.

Dr. Zahi Hawass’s Hat - How sales of replicas of Dr. Hawass’s famous hat are helping a new Children’s Museum in Cairo.

The Amarna Project - Barry Kemp, in the sixth in a series of articles on the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, looks at why Amarna died, using the latest archaeological evidence and research.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at Jackal Gods.

 

52 - Volume Nine Issue Four February/March 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest new discoveries, news and reports from around Egypt.

Three Restored Statues in Luxor - AE explains how three historically and artistically important statues of New Kingdom warrior pharaohs were restored for display in the new annex of the Luxor Museum.

The Egypt’s Sunken Treasures

Miriam Azahara García reports for AE on the exhibition currently on display in Turin.

The Coptic Museum in Cairo - Jill Kamil visits the recently-restored museum and describes some of its treasures.

Pharaoh Hadrian and God Antinous - Dylan Bickerstaffe tells the story of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, his connection with Egypt and the death, in Egypt, of his lover Antinous.

Bonaparte in Egypt - Cathie Bryan visits a special new exhibition currently showing in Paris.

The Egypt Exploration Society - In the first of a series of articles on the history and work of the Egypt Exploration Society, Dr. Patricia Spencer looks at the past, present and future work of the Society.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at Beds.

Obelisks in Exile - AE suggests a solution to the ‘bird problem’ suffered by Cleopatra’s Needle in London.

 

53 - Volume Nine Issue Five April/May 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest new discoveries, news and reports from around Egypt.

Conservation and Restoration in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo - Nacho Ares describes a behind-the-scenes visit to an important part of the famous museum.

 New Perspectives in UK Museums - Simon Stephens looks at many museums with newly opened (or planned) Egyptology displays. 

Luxor: the view from above - A new look at some of the great monuments and landscape of ancient Thebes. 

Solar Alignments in Egyptian Temples - Many of Luxor’s temples are orientated towards the midwinter sunrise, reveals David Furlong.

 The Lost Necropolis of South Asasif - Dr. Elena Pischikova tells of her work in conserving some important tombs on the West Bank at Luxor.

 The Berlin Amarna Princess - Peter Funnell describes this Egyptian Masterpiece.

 The Egypt Exploration Society - In the second of a series of articles, Christopher Naunton looks at the role of the EES in 2009.

  The Market on the Riverbank - Charlotte Booth joins Rosalind & Jac Janssen to explain how ancient Egyptians ‘bought and sold’.

 Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at Horus, Son of Isis.

 Don’t miss ... The Tomb of Menna - A brief look at a remarkable tomb in Luxor.

 

54 - Volume Nine Issue Six June/July 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest new discoveries, news and reports from around Egypt.

The Mosque of Abu Hagag - AE reports on the completed restoration of the mosque in the heart of the Temple of Luxor.

Dental Health & Dentistry in Ancient Egypt - Roger Forshaw described how the ancient Egyptians cared (or failed to care) for their teeth.

KV-63 Update: the 2009 Season - In AE’s fifth article Roxanne Wilson brings us the latest news on the tomb’s fascinating contents.

The Egypt Exploration Society - In the third of a series of articles on the work of the Egypt Exploration Society, Dr. Penny Wilson looks at the work of The Delta Survey.

Do not Miss ... The Open Air Museum at Karnak Temple - A brief look at a part of the Temple often missed by tourists.

Tutankhamun’s Headrests - Jan Summers Duffy describes the unique set of headrests discovered in Tutankhamun’s Tomb, some of which he may have used in life.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at floors in ancient Egypt in an article entitled “Right Under Your Feet”.

End Note: Tutankhamun’s Trumpets - Maggie Lyons describes the trumpets found in Tutankamun’s tomb and how they can still be heard.

 

55 - Volume Ten Issue One August/September 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher brings readers the latest news from around Egypt.

The Temple of Montu at El Tod - Betty Schneider looks at the little-visited temple of the god Montu at El Tod, to the south of Luxor.

The Missing Sarcophagus of Menkaura - Jon Bodsworth creates a virtual reconstruction of the king’s missing sarcophagus.

Osirisnet.net - Thierry Benderitter introduces his special web site, about to the tombs and mastabas of Egypt.

The Geology of Egypt - Colin Reader overviews the way the Egyptian landmass evolved and affected the ancient civilisation.

Ancient Egypt at Highclere Castle - visits a new exhibition dedicated to the Fifth Earl of Carnarvon, his work in Egypt and his well-known connection to Tutankhamun.

The Geology of Egypt - Colin Reader overviews the way the Egyptian landmass evolved and affected the ancient civilisation.

The Seth-animal: a Dog and its Master - Ken Moss describes the uncertainty about the identity of the Seth-animal and suggests a likely candidate.

The Egypt Exploration Society - In the fourth of a series of articles on the work of the EES, Dr. Judith Bunbury looks at Egypt and the Global Cooling Crisis.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Hilary Wilson looks at Greeks, Wells and Shadows – ancient measurements.

The Last Inhabitants of Qurna - Just before the last family was re-located to Gabawi, Marwa Basry was born.

 

56 - Volume Ten Issue Two October/November 2009

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher.

Re-Sealing of KV62 - The sealing and re-sealing of the Tomb of  Tutankhamun. Steve Cross.

Bits and Pieces - What to do with damaged, modest or incomplete Egyptian antiquities. Earl Ertman.

Nabta Playa Saved - Nabta Playa is relatively unknown; where and what is it? Raymond Betz.

The Mortuary Temple of Merenptah - AE explores a little-visited temple in Luxor.

An Unexpected Turkish Delight - An Egyptian/Turkish connection. Mark Walker.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Ancient Egyptians in and on the river Nile.

Egyptian Masterpieces - looks at an ancient statue of a scribe.

The Sycomore and The Fig - A look at these special plants in ancient Egypt.

The Egypt Exploration Society - Late antique and mediaeval material found at Qasr Ibrim in Nubia. Joost Hagen.

How old is that mummy? - Aidan Dodson.

 

57 - Volume Ten Issue Three December 2009 / January 2010

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher brings the latest news from Luxor, Cairo, Alexandria, Rosetta and Damietta.

A Relief of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III in Bournemouth - Stephanie Roberts reports on a fine relief of the joint pharaohs, and speculates on its possible original provenance.

Description de l’Égypte - It is 200 years since the publication of the results of the French study of Egypt, which also inspired a Sèvres china table service once owned by the Duke of Wellington.

Why did ancient Egyptians mummify their dead? - Bob Partridge proposes some possible reasons for the introduction of mummification and dispels some myths.

Inspired by Egypt - Ancient Egypt inspires a modern work of art by Canadian artist Robert Isler Wanka.

Into Egypt’s Eastern Desert - An exploration of the geology and antiquities of Egypt’s Eastern Desert by Colin Reader.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - The Trees of the Garden by Hilary Wilson.

The Egypt Exploration Society - Its recent work and future projects explained by Chris Naunton, EES Deputy Director.

Egypt in Leeds - AE visits an Egyptian ‘temple’ in Leeds.

 

58 - Volume Ten Issue Four February/March 2010

News from Egypt - The latest news from Luxor, Aswan, the Fayum, the Delta and Cairo brought to you by Ayman Wahby Taher, our Egypt Correspondent; and news of the work of Chicago House in Luxor from its Director, W. Raymond Johnson.

The Missing Link - Mike Neilson reveals how a fragment of a statue from Saqqara has helped to identify a well-known statue in the British Museum.

Into Egypt’s Eastern Desert -Continuing an exploration of the geology and antiquities of Egypt’s Eastern Desert by Colin Reader.

Investigating Early Mummification - Vicky Gashe describes her work on the origins of mummification in Egypt

The Cult of the Apis Bull - The worship of the Apis Bull was one of the longest-lasting cults of the Egyptian Pantheon, as Maxwell Stocker explains.

The Belly of Stones - Betty Winkelman looks at the great Middle Kingdom fortresses in Nubia, now lost beneath the waters of Lake Nasser.

Featured Pharaoh: Senusret III - AE looks at the reign of this Middle Kingdom king.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - Ancient Egyptian Flowers, by Hilary Wilson.

Architectural Gems: The “Pharaoh’s Bed” at Philae.

 

59 - Volume Ten Issue Five April/May 2010

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher brings you the latest news from Alexandria, Giza, Saqqara, Abydos, Dendera and Luxor.

An Alabaster Coffin and Sety I’s Last Secret - Stephen Cross looks at Sety’s coffin and finds that the circumstances of its discovery and its condition may indicate that the king’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings may still hide some secrets.

Thoroughly Modern Mummies - Dr. Ryan Metcalfe reveals how modern science and experiments are revealing more about ancient mummification techniques.

Amarna Update - A brief update on recent excavation and conservation in the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - A Sense of Smell – ancient perfumes and scented flowers described by Hilary Wilson.

Life in Paradise: Tombs of the Nobles at Thebes - In edited extracts from his new book The Lost Tombs of Thebes: Life in Paradise, Dr. Zahi Hawass describes the exquisite and sometimes little-known Tombs of the Nobles at Thebes, and reports on new discoveries and conservation work in the area.

The Department of Ancient Egypt - and Sudan at the British Museum - In one of a series of articles on the work of the BM, Dr. Daniel Antoine looks at Life and Death in the Nile Valley – Bioarchaeological Research at the British Museum, including reports on some new studies on human remains from Sudan.

Tutankhamun’s Family - DNA tests on their mummies enable five generations of his family tree to be reconstructed.

 

60 - Volume Ten Issue Six June/July 2010

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher brings you the latest news, from Cairo, Saqqara, Aswan and Luxor.

The Tomb of Karakhamun - Birgit Schoer reports on work at the long-lost tomb of Karakhamun at Luxor, that is revealing new information about the tomb and its owner.

An Italian Mummy Mystery - Sabina Malgora and Anna Pieri examine a mummy in an Italian museum collection and discover all is not what it would seem to be.

An Fleet of Ancient Model Boats - Craig S. Milner describes the remarkable discovery of a large number of tomb models at Deir el-Bersha, including a fleet of boats that have been conserved and are now on display in Boston.

Campaniform to Composite - Peter Phillips discusses the evolution of the composite form of ancient Egyptian columns.

The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum - In the second of a series of articles, Dr. Neal Spencer reports on how the Museum is helping to train Egyptian and Sudanese archaeologists.

Per Mesut: for younger readers - In this issue Hilary Wilson discusses Snakes.

Temples, Tombs and Tourists - Tony Holmes looks at ancient and modern tourism.

Minoans and Mycenaeans in Ancient Egypt - Marta Farrugia and Anton Mifsud show that the depictions on the walls of early New Kingdom tombs prove that Minoans and Mycenaeans were in contact with ancient Egypt.

 

61 - Volume Eleven Issue One August/September 2010

From our Egypt Correspondent -Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Cairo, Saqqara, Lahun, Bahariya, Luxor, etc.

‘Amarna’ in Aswan - Andrew Fulton reports on an important and overlooked monument, dating to the reign of Akhenaten, that can be found at Aswan.

How Now Sick Cow? - Conni Lord looks at the evidence for veterinary care in ancient Egypt.

Egypt, Durham and Japan - Helen Armstrong and Rachel Grocke reveal the work involved in arranging an exhibition in Japan of objects from the Oriental Museum in Durham.

The Anubi Project - Sabina Malgora and Imerio Palumbo join a novel motorbike rally on a journey through part of Egypt’s Western Desert.

King Narmer’s Electric Catfish - Rosalind Park reveals the shocking story of the role of catfish in ancient Egypt.

Evidence for Expeditions to Punt - Cheryl Ward describes a significant discovery which reveals much about the seafaring expeditions to Punt from Red Sea ports.

The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum - In the third of a series of articles on the work of the Department, Dr. Julie Anderson reports on the Museum’s collections from Sudan and Nubia.

H.W. Seton-Karr’s Flint Collections - Mark Trumpour investigates why a collection of Egyptian flint implements is now in Canada.

 

62 - Volume Eleven Issue Two October/November 2010

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Cairo, Saqqara, Karnak, and Medinet Habu, plus a special report on a Temple of Sety I at Wadi Kanayis.

Sailing in the Wake of Hatshepsut - Cheryl Ward reports the building and sailing on the Red Sea of a full-sized replica of the boat used on Hatshepsut’s journey to Punt.

The False Door of Useramun - Mansour Boraik examines in detail an Eighteenth Dynasty false door recently discovered at the Temple of Karnak.

Egypt, Eton and Birmingham - AE reports on a new exhibition of objects from the collection of Eton College, currently on display at the Barber Institute in Birmingham, and on how the Eton Collection is being temporarily divided in order for it to be fully studied and published.

As Good as the Real Thing? - Jaromir Malek comments on a major touring exhibition, currently showing in mainland Europe and opening soon in Manchester in the UK, which features full-scale replicas of many of the objects from the Tomb of Tutankhamun.

The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum - In the fourth of a series of articles on the work of the Department, AE looks at The Book of the Dead, which is the subject of a major new exhibition due to open soon at the Museum.

Per Mesut: For Younger Readers - In this issue, Hilary Wilson’s article is entitled “What’s in a Name? (Part 1)”.

 

63 - Volume Eleven Issue Three December 2010 / January 2011

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from  Giza, Cairo, Middle Egypt and Luxor.

Early Explorers of Egypt’s Western Desert - Peter Stevens follows in the tracks of the first Europeans to travel in the Western Desert; a journey that is still difficult today.

The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum - In the last of a series of articles on the work of the Department, Elisabeth R. O’Connell looks at the Late Antique objects from Egypt and how and where they were collected.

Replicating an Ancient Egyptian Masterpiece - AE reveals that ancient skills have not been lost and follows the work of a modern Egyptian craftsman in copying Tutankhamun’s throne.

Wonderful Things - AE visits a major exhibition of full-scale replicas of objects from Tutankhamun’s tomb, currently in Manchester and Cologne, and also opening in Dublin in early 2011.

Replicating Tutankhamun’s Tomb - AE looks at how a Spanish company, Factum Arte, is using the latest technology to create a perfect copy of Tutankhamun’s tomb as a way of helping to preserve the original.

An Egyptophile in Egypt Laura Ranieri offers tips, tactics and practical information to the tourist visiting Egypt for the first time.

Per Mesut: For Younger Readers In this issue, Hilary Wilson’s article is entitled What’s in a Name? (Part 2).
 

 

64 - Volume Eleven Issue Four February/March 2011

From our Egypt Correspondent - Ayman Wahby Taher with the latest news from Cairo, Luxor, the Fayum and the Sinai.

Auguste Mariette, 1821-1881 - Chris Humber tells the story of the founder of the Egyptian Antiquities Service and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

The Paleopathology of Egyptian Mummies - Michael R. Zimmerman looks at how morbid curiosity has been replaced by more scientific approach to mummy studies.

‘Re-excavating’ Egyptian Predynastic Sites in London - G.J. Tassie and Joris van Wetering reveal how and why a collection of Predynastic material has recently been returned to Egypt.

Misdemeanours at Deir el-Medina - Benedict Davies tells readers about the troublesome lives of some of the inhabitants of the Workmen’s Village.

Tutankhamun’s Khepesh Swords - Historical weapons expert Mike Loades examines two swords from the king’s tomb.

The American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) - In the first of a series of articles on the work of ARCE, Director Gerry Scott looks at the Centre’s early years.

The Egyptian Lodge in St. Helier - Mark Walker investigates a house in Jersey.

Per Mesut: For Younger Readers - In this issue, Hilary Wilson’s article looks a the hieroglyph hotep and its meaning. 

 

65 - Volume Eleven Issue Five April/May 2011

News from the Editors and from our Egypt Correspondent - A special extended report from the Editors and from Ayman Wahby Taher on recent developments in Egypt and on the damage to and theft of antiquities.

 Takabuti: a Twenty-fifth Dynasty Egyptian Lady - A mummy in the Ulster Museum in Belfast, which has fascinated generations of visitors, reveals information about her life and times  following a scientific examination by Eileen Murphy, Rosalie David and Winifred Glover.

 Why Belzoni Went to Egypt - Bill Keys reveals the reason why Belzoni made his first, fateful visit to Egypt.

 Colour in Ancient Egypt - Research chemist Alan Reiblein takes a close look at the colours that decorated ancient Egyptian tombs, temples and objects, and at how they were prepared and used.

 The American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) - In the second of a series of articles on the work of ARCE, Dr. Gerry Scott and John Shearman look at ARCE’s work in Luxor.

 Secret Egypt: Unravelling Truth from Myth - Ali Wells, Chris Kirby and Sally Johnson describe a new exhibition in Coventry.

 Per Mesut: For Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson looks at The Demon Drink.

 Egyptomania Comes to China As W. Benson Harer Jr. explains.

 

66 - Volume Eleven Issue Six June/July 2011

News from the Editors - A report on the recent return of stolen objects to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo and other news from around the world. gg

News from Egypt - Egypt correspondent Ayman Wahby Taher reports from Alexandria, the Fayum and Luxor.

Cleanliness is Next to Godliness - Charlotte Booth investigates hygiene in ancient Egyptian society.

Frogs in Ancient Egyptian Art - Magda van Ryneveld looks at the depictions of a small amphibian often heard in Egypt but rarely seen.

From Foe to Pharaoh: Libyans and Egypt - Andrew Fulton examines the ancient relationship between Egypt and Libya.

Egypt in Jersey - The Egyptian connection with the island of Jersey is revealed by John J. Taylor.

 The Long-Lost Work of Frédéric Cailliaud - In the third article in a series by ARCE, Andrew Bednarski highlights one example of the Center’s publication activities.

The Leather Funerary Baldachin of Isetemkheb - Edward Loring describes the unique canopy of the daughter of a High Priest of Amun.

 

67 - Volume Twelve Issue One August/September 2011

News from the Editor - Brief reports of some Egyptological activities worldwide and discoveries in Egypt.

News from Egypt - Egypt correspondent Ayman Wahby Taher reports from Cairo, Saqqara and Suez.

News from Amarna, June 2011 - Barry Kemp proves that the work of the Amarna Project is still continuing.

Epigraphic Survey/Chicago House - A report by W. Raymond Johnson of the recent activities of the University of Chicago’s Epigraphic Survey in Luxor.

Revealing the Secrets of Dendera - Ayman Wahby Taher describes the temple he has known from childhood.

Gardens in Ancient Egypt - Angela Torpey investigates the evidence for horticulture in the ancient Nile Valley.

Tell Edfu - Nadine Moeller describes her ongoing excavation of the Old and Middle Kingdom urban site beside the Ptolemaic temple.

American Research Center in Egypt - In the fourth article in a series by ARCE, Christie Pohl describes the training and conservation work of the Center.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson tells readers about the Children she met on a recent trip to Luxor.

Obituary - Robert Bernard Partridge, 10th April 1951 - 10th July 2011

 

68 - Volume Twelve Issue Two October/November 2011

Film Memorabilia - Mark Walker reports on the recent sale of objects collected by Debbie Reynolds.

Ancient Egyptian Shields - Bob Partridge describes the use of these vital pieces of military equipment.

The Tomb of the Three Princesses - The story of the discovery of this tomb in a remote wadi is told by Anne Midgley.

New Light on Egypt in England - Cathie Bryan takes a fresh look at the Egyptian influence on architecture 1837-1935.

The First Tombs of Ancient Egypt - Nacho Ares describes the evolution of funerary architecture at Abydos and Saqqara.

The Garstang Project - Three postgraduates write about a project based upon the work of John Garstang.

How to Destroy an Amarna Statue - A study by Kristin Thompson of the ways in which Amarnan statuary was broken up.

In the fifth article in a series by ARCE, Jocelyn Goharty describes the work of documenting talatat at Karnak.

Old Kingdom Tomb Art - Sarah Griffiths explores the conventions of two-dimensional art in the tomb of Kagemni.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson on Nomes and Boundaries.

 

69 - Volume Twelve Issue Three December 2011 / January 2012

An Unnamed Statue of a Vizier - Susanna Thomas investigates a Middle Kingdom statue found in the ‘Karnak Cachette’.

Egypt at the Crystal Palace - The rise and fall of the Palace and its ‘Egyptian’ Court are described by Birgit Schoer.

Atum: Creating the World - In the first of a series of articles about Egypt’s gods, Joyce Tyldesley considers this solar deity.

Egyptology in Liverpool - Some of the fascinating objects in the World Museum, Liverpool and the Garstang Museum.

Lorenzo Dow Covington - Glenn Marcoe records the work at Giza of a pioneering Egyptologist.

Monasteries in Ancient Egypt - Muriel O’Shea visits some of the early monastic settlements.

A Volunteer’s Diary - Patricia Mason describes her experiences helping at an excavation in the South Asasif.

ARCE in the Egyptian Museum - In the last in a series of articles about the Center’s work, Janice Kamrin, Rachel Mauldin, Elina Nuutinen and Sari Nieminen describe the Registrars’ Training and Database Program in the Cairo Museum.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes the Forty-Two statements of the Negative Confession.

 

70 - Volume Twelve Issue Four February/March 2012

News from the Editor - Egyptological news from Egypt and the UK.

News from Amarna - Professor Barry Kemp, Director of the Amarna Project, reports on the 2011 season of restoration and excavation of Akhenaten’s capital city.

Nefertiti’s New Home - The Neues Museum in Berlin, which now houses the world-famous bust of Nefertiti as well as one of the finest Egyptogy collections in the world, is itself a remarkable building, as Mark Walker explains.

The Metropolitan Dig House - Marcel and Monica Maessen write about one of the most impressive of the ‘homes from home’ occupied by Egyptologists working for long periods in Egypt.

The KNH Centre - Rosalie David describes the Centre’s research project based upon the finds of Sir Grafton Elliot Smith and AE’s Editor reports on the exhibition Grave Secrets.

Egypt’s Western Desert - Colin Reader describes the underlying geology that shapes the landscape of this fascinating region of Egypt.

South Asasif Necropolis: Season 2011 -  A busy year of excavation and restoration at an important Late Period tomb is described by Dr. Elena Pischicova.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes how the Ancient Egyptians solved the problem of Living Without Money.

 

71 - Volume Twelve Issue Five April/May 2012

News from the Editor - Egyptological news from Egypt and the UK, including a report on the Pharaoh King of Egypt Exhibition in Leeds.

Outstanding Egypt - Alan Jeffreys brings readers some beautiful nineteenth century stereo images of Egypt.

Egypt’s Green Pump for All Time - The story of the sakiyya is told by Bill Key.

The KNH Centre - The role of teeth in reconstructing life from the skeleton is described by Roger Forshaw.

Egypt in 1931 - Anne Midgley recreates her grandfather’s adventurous visit.

Egypt in 1949/50 - Ivan Sparkes describes his experiences as a soldier stationed in the country.

Meroë: The Last Outpost of Ancient Egypt - The history and monuments of this region in Sudanese Upper Nubia are examined and illustrated by Dr. Aidan Dodson.

Osiris: King of the Dead - The second in a series about Egypt’s gods and goddesses written by Dr. Joyce Tyldesley.

Egypt’s Heritage as Gifts - Hend Abd el-Rahman tells readers about the many treasures given away to foreigners.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes the use of horns in the iconography of ancient Egypt.

 

72 - Volume Twelve Issue Six June/July 2012

News from the Editor - Changes to the familiar landscape of Luxor and its ancient monuments, and other Egyptological news from Egypt and the UK.

Ancient Egypt’s Gemstones - Expert James Harrell identifies the stones used by the ancient Egyptians in their jewellery.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes how “The Moon’s a Baboon” in ancient Egyptian iconography.

King Ahmose 0 - French excavations at Karnak have revealed a new candidate for the founder of the Eighteenth Dynasty.

The KNH Centre - In the third of a series of articles based around the work of the Centre, Jenny Cockitt tells readers about George Reisner’s Year in Nubia.

A ROMAN Bath at Karnak - In an exclusive report, Mansour Boraik and Salah El-Masekh describe a major new discovery in front of the First Pylon at the Temple of Karnak – a Roman bath complex beside the Ptolemaic one. With an update by the Editor listing the very latest finds.

Was Tutankhamun Killed by a Hippo? - Medical specialist W. Benson Harer Jr. examines the evidence for his radical new theory.

Two Notable Dwarfs - Dwarfs are often depicted in ancient Egyptian art and sometimes held important positions in society, as Sue Dykes reports.

 

73 - Volume Thirteen Issue One August/September 2012

From the Editor - An intriguing stela from Leiden and Egyptianising architecture in Liverpool.

A Ka Statue of Iteti Ankhiris - Susanna Thomas investigates a statue now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

News from Amarna, Spring 2012 - Barry Kemp brings readers the latest news of his excavations at Akhenaten’s capital city.

The KNH Centre - In the fourth of a series of articles based around the work of the Centre, Ryan Metcalfe tells readers about Ancient Nubian Brewing.

Two Unusual Artifacts - A report by Glenn Markoe on two objects in the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Hector Horeau - A selection of Horeau’s beautiful watercolours illustrate Luigi Prada and Jaromir Malek’s article about this extraordinary nineteenth century architect and traveller.

Beauty, Purity, Preservation and Durability ... Artifacts of Stone - Stone artifacts found in tombs, including Tutankhamun’s, are described by Jan Summers Duffy.

Isis: Great of Magic - The third article by Joyce Tyldesley on Egypt’s better-known gods and goddesses.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes The Changing Faces of the Moon [-god].

 

74 - Volume Thirteen Issue Two October/November 2012

From the Editor - Including reports on the AWT Conference and The British Museum Colloquium.

Pharaoh’s Magic Wand? - Dylan Bickerstaffe asks what DNA can really tell us about the Amarna royal family.

Amarna Shabtis - “Why were shabtis still in use in Akhenaten’s reign?” asks Nacho Ares.

The KNH Centre - In the fifth of a series of articles based around the work of the Centre, Pauline Norris tells readers about The Lettuce Connection.

Who Built the Pyramids? - Hilary Wilson examines the evidence.

The Father of Diplomacy - was Amenhotep III, argues professional diplomat Kristian Bonnici.

A Visit to Egypt in 1931 - Fifteen vintage postcards from Anne Midgley’s collection.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson tells us about the trouble with statues revealed in the Amarna Letters.

Was Tutankamun Killed by a Hippo? - the sequel - Peter Sheldrick supports the hypothesis.

The Geology of Giza - Colin Reader points out that the body of the Sphinx can teach us much about the geological history of Giza.

 

75 - Volume Thirteen Issue Three December 2012 / January 2013

From the Editor - News from Egypt, the opening of the new Manchester Museum galleries, and a sad loss.

Servants of Hekhet - Lou Selene-Sayell describes midwifery and childbirth in ancient Egypt.

The Somers Clarke House at El-Kab - The Belgian dig-house is in need of urgent repairs, reports Raymond Betz.

Can You Play Senet? - Ian Johnsone tells you how.

The KNH Centre - In the sixth of a series of articles based around the work of the Centre, Iwona Kosieradzka-Ogunmakin comes Face-to-Face with the Dead.

The Manchester Museum - Campbell Price introduces the new Egyptology galleries.

The Ancient Practice of Tattooing - The art of skin decoration dates back to prehistoric times, says Elisabeth Kerner.

Who Was the Father of Diplomacy? - Jennifer Stephenson takes issue with the article in AE74 and introduces her own candidate for the role.

Hathor: the Golden One - In the fourth article in a series, Joyce Tyldesley tells us about the cow-goddess.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - In the run-up to Christmas, Hilary Wilson tells us about ancient Egyptian Toys.

 

76 - Volume Thirteen Issue Four February/March 2013

From the Editor - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere, some good and some bad.

Mentuemhet, Prince of Thebes - Betty Schneider describes the rise to power of a noble of the Third Intermediate Period.

Technological Giants - Alan Reiblein explores the achievements of the ancient Egyptians in various technologies.

The Belgian Excavations in Elkab - Raymond Betz summarises the huge achievements of the Belgian mission to Elkab during the past seventy-five years.

Death and Life in Old Kingdom Elkab - The Belgian mission to Elkab has recently made the remarkable discovery of an Old Kingdom town, as Dirk Huyge describes.

The Sacred Ibis - Stephanie Atherton looks at one of the iconic symbols of ancient Egypt.

The Amarna Project - Prof. Barry Kemp brings readers up to date with the work of his team last autumn.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson writes about Popular Songs.

Beautiful Butterfies - Their use in ancient Egyptian art is described by Magda van Ryneveld.

Ancient and Modern Animal Care - Diane Woolley discovers that animals may be capable of choosing their own medicines!

 

77 - Volume Thirteen Issue Five April/May 2013

Editorial and News from Amarna - Egyptological news including the latest Amarna report from Barry Kemp and Anna Stevens.

The Battle of Qadesh: Historical Truth or Royal Propaganda? … asks Diana Liesegang.

Rameses the Great – the Father of Public Relations - Kristian Bonnici argues the case.

The Making of Description de l’Égypte - W. Benson Harer Jr. tells how Napoleon invented Egyptology with the “mother of all coffee-table books”.

Three Wines for Tutankhamun’s Transfiguration - Maria Rosa Guasch Jané explores the significance of three wine jars in the king’s tomb.

‘Ice Age’ Art at Qurta - Dirk Huyge describes how the oldest rock engravings in North Africa were dated.

Images of Women from Deir el-Medina - Joanne Backhouse examines ostraca and figurines depicting the women of the village.

Tutankhamun: Life after Death - Joyce Tyldesley considers the modern legend of Tutankhamun’s Curse.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson tells us about stone beads.

Third Dynasty Head Discovered - Dirk Huyge reports an important find in the Royal Museums of Art and History in Brussels.

 

78 - Volume Thirteen Issue Six June/July 2013

 From the Editor - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

Eye on the Needle - We introduce a film about the plight of ‘Cleopatra’s Needle’ in London.

Horemheb: Founder of the Nineteenth Dynasty ... argues Charlotte Booth.

The Tomb of Meresankh III at Giza - Geoffrey Lenox-Smith describes a visit to this impressive mastaba tomb.

Unique Geometric Rock Art at el-Hosh - Dirk Huyge and Per Storemyr describe the discovery of a ‘masterpiece’ in 2010.

Seth: the Complex God - Joyce Tyldesley continues her series of articles examining Egypt’s better-known deities.

Drug Use in Ancient Egypt - Drugs for both medical and recreational use are identified by Lou Selene-Sayell.

Egyptology and Photography: Two Founding Fathers - The connections between Karl Richard Lepsius and William Henry Fox Talbot are explored by James Downs.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes Shiny Things made of faience.

Tutankhamun’s Bracelets - The bracelets found among the jewellery in the tomb are examined by Jan Summers Duffy.

 

79 - Volume Fourteen Issue One August/September 2013

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

The Use of Ivory in Ancient Egypt - Magda van Ryneveld describes the use of this popular and versatile material.

Nephepetra Mentuhotep: the Great Reunifier - The warrior king from the south left an enduring legacy, as Sarah Griffiths discovered.

Walk Like an Egyptian - ... among the Egyptianising tombs of Kensal Green Cemetery with Cathie Bryan.

Epigraphic Survey/Chicago House 2011-2013 Field Season - W. Raymond Johnson brings readers news of the work of his team in Luxor during the last season.

To Be Or Not To Be: Circumcision in Ancient Egypt - Finding evidence for this ancient practice can be tricky says Connie Lord.

“The Name’s Over The Door”: Ancient Egyptian Funerary Cones - Peter Clayton looks at this neglected but important source of information.

A Ptolemaic Bust in Mariemont Museum: The Detective Story ... is recounted by Raymond Betz.

Maths in Ancient Egypt - Egypt’s important role in the early history of mathematics is explained by Elizabeth Hind.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson explains the meaning of “Brothers and Sisters”.

 

80 - Volume Fourteen Issue Two October/November 2013

From the Editor - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere, including the destruction of Mellawi Museum.

Cobra Goddesses - Joyce Tyldesley continues her series of articles examining Egypt’s better-known deities.

How West Park Museum Acquired its Collection - Alan Hayward and Rose Smith tell the story of Marianne Brocklehurst’s contribution.

Sandal-Making in Ancient Egypt is described by Magda van Ryneveld.

Crumbling Pyramids - An explanation for the collapse of some pyramids is suggested by Peter James.

Making Khufu’s Granite Sarcophagus Experiments - by Denys Stocks reveal the secrets of the ancient stone-workers.

Egypt at Pompeii -The inhabitants of Pompeii were evidently fascinated by the culture of Ancient Egypt.

The Temple of Isis at Pompeii - Mark Walker describes this iconic building, compares it with Egyptian temples dedicated to Isis, and considers how it has been portrayed in modern fiction and on film.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson explains the meaning to Ancient Egyptians of“Green”.

Egyptianising Liverpool - Fay Samuels brings readers more examples of the influence of Egypt on the city’s architecture.

 

81 - Volume Fourteen Issue Three December 2013 / January 2014

From the Editors  - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

‘Scribes of Outlines: Drawing in Ancient Egypt’ - The extraordinary artistic skill of the scribes of ancient Egypt is displayed in a major exhibition now showing in Brussels, reviewed here by Raymond Betz.

The Meidum Pyramid: Revisited - Colin Reader takes a fresh look at the ownership of the Meidum Pyramid and the theory that it collapsed in antiquity.

The Parisian Louxor Cinema Palace - A newly-restored Egyptian Art Deco masterpiece is described by Cathie Bryan.

The Smouha Excavations - Marie-Cécile Bruwier describes excavations to discover the remains of a Graeco-Roman building in a suburb of Alexandria.

The Royal Cemeteries of Nubia - Betty Winkelman investigates Nubia’s earliest pharaonic traditions and the Kushite rulers who controlled two kingdoms.

The Myth of Hypatia - The legend and the reality of the life of the Alexandrian mathematician, feminist icon and martyr are examined by Charlotte Booth.

Egyptomania: Songs for Swinging Mummies! - Bob Brier enjoys a sing-song around the piano with a selection of Egypt-inspired tunes.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes the ancient Egyptians’ understanding of medicine and how they treated injuries with Tried and Tested methods.

 

82 - Volume Fourteen Issue Four February/March 2014

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

Annie Abernathie Quibell - Lee Young tells readers about the little-known wife of a famous Egyptologist, an artist who made a great contribution to Egyptology herself.

Divine Kings - In the seventh of her series of articles exploring Egypt’s better-known gods and goddesses, Joyce Tyldesley considers the kings who thought of themselves as living gods.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson describes the Medical Profession in ancient Egypt.

Excavations in Front of Karnak - Salah el-Masekh describes the excavation of a massive embankment wall running from Karnak to Luxor and the discovery of an interesting New Kingdom stela re-used in Ptolemaic buildings.

The Metal that Fell from the Sky - Diane Johnson and Joyce Tyldesley describe their on-going research into the sources, uses and symbolic meanings of iron in pre-Iron Age Egypt.

The Cone on the Head and the Ba on Earth - Joan Padgham has a new theory to explain the meaning of the mysterious cones depicted in New Kingdom tomb scenes.

Speak My Name! - In the first of two articles, Andrew Fulton investigates how the first pharaohs developed their impressive royal titulary.

 

83 - Volume Fourteen Issue Five April/May 2014

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

Ancient Egypt in Your Home - The late Editor of AE, Bob Partridge, explains his passion for collecting replicas of ancient Egyptian artifacts.

Speak My Name: - Politics and Damnatio Memoriae - In the second of his two articles, Andrew Fulton explains how pharaohs’ names were used and abused by their descendants.

Ancient Egypt in Rome - Mark Walker explores Italy’s capital and finds ancient Egyptian obelisks in the city’s squares, ancient Egyptian statues in the Vatican Museums and film-sets of ancient Egyptian cities in Cinecitta.

The Ancient Egyptian Legal System - “Legal systems and customs have functioned as central features of societies throughout recorded history”, says Max Stocker. What did law mean to the ancient Egyptian?

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - In this issue, Hilary Wilson looks at what Doors – Real and Imagined meant to the ancient Egyptians.

When and Why was the Great Sphinx Made? - The origins and date of this mysterious monument at Giza are still hotly debated by Egyptologists. Peter Lacovara gives readers his opinions on the subject

 

84 - Volume Fourteen Issue Six June/July 2014

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

News from Amarna - A brief summary of the latest work by Professor Barry Kemp’s team re-excavating the Great Aten Temple at Amarna.

Baden-Powell and Ancient Egypt - The founder of the Boy Scout movement was also interested in ancient Egypt as John Ditchfield reveals.

The Ancient Egyptians Were Human Too ... says Charlotte Booth.

Harold Jones, Artist and Egyptologist - Nan Evans tells the story of the tragically short life of this talented “Welshman in Egypt”.

The Sphinx: Evolution of a Concept - Colin Reader explains why he believes that the Great Sphinx at Giza was first carved as a lion in the Early Dynastic Period.

Egyptomania for Ladies - In the first of two articles, Anne Midgley shares pictures of some of her favourite Egypt-inspired household items.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - The use of ducks for food, as offerings and as a decorative theme in a wide range of ancient Egyptian items, is explored by Hilary Wilson.

Neith: the Warrior Goddess - In the eighth in her series of articles about Egypt’s better-known gods, Joyce Tyldesley considers the attributes of Neith.

 

85 - Volume Fifteen Issue One August/September 2014

A Mentuhotep II Chapel at Abydos - A brief report by Ayman Mohamed Damarany on the discovery of a mahat chapel of Mentuhotep II.

 Playing with Fire - The ancient Egyptians had about thirty different words for fire; Jill Smethills investigates the meaning of some of them.

 Egypt’s Earliest Queens - Joyce Tyldesley begins a new series of articles on the better-known queens of Egypt.

Egyptology at Oxford - Professor Richard Parkinson gives his personal view of the Griffith Institute.

Discovering Tutankhamun - Paul Collins and Liam McNamara introduce an exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum celebrating the 75th anniversary of the foundation of the Griffith Institute.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hearts and Minds. The ancient Egyptians thought that the heart rather than the brain was the seat of the intellect, says Hilary Wilson.

Egypt’s Master Jewellers - The secrets of how ancient craftsmen created such beautiful objects from tough semi-precious stones are investigated by Andrea Whytock.

Thutmose III The Builder - Betty Winkelman describes the warrior king’s Mansions of Millions of Years and some of his other many building projects.

 

86 - Volume Fifteen Issue Two October/November 2014

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere; also reports on the Goodison collection by Joanne Chamberlain and a Howard Carter exhibition by Christopher Coleman.

Queens of the Old Kingdom (1) - Joyce Tyldesley reviews the evidence for the ‘Pyramid Queens’ of the Fourth Dynasty.

He of the Two Deserts: King Den - Andrew Fulton investigates what is known about a king of the First Dynasty.

The Discs of Hemaka - Magda van Ryneveld examines some remarkable items found in the tomb of one of Den’s most powerful courtiers.

How Were the Pyramids Built?  - Two contradictory solutions to this perennial problem are presented by Greg Moress and Peter James.

The Decipherment of Hieroglyphs and the Champollion Museum - Raymond Betz takes readers on a tour of a museum in Champollion’s home town of Figeac.

Tutankhamun’s Linen Pall - Jan Summers investigates one of the artefacts from the boy king’s tomb that did not fare well following its discovery.

More Egyptomania for Ladies - Egyptianising design in fashion, jewellery, games and advertising is explored by Anne Midgley.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Egypt in Africa. The roots of Egyptian civilisation lie there, says Hilary Wilson.

 

87 - Volume Fifteen Issue Three December 2014 / January 2015

From the Editors - Egyptological news from Egypt and elsewhere.

The Aberdonian Egyptologists - The lives and legacies of James Grant and Robert Wilson are recounted by Max Stocker.

Cairo to Constantinople - An exhibition at Buckingham Palace of early photos is introduced by Alessandro Nasini.

Sithathoriunet’s Tomb and Treasures - are described by Wolfram Grajetzki.

Queens of the Old Kingdom (2) - Joyce Tyldesley reviews the evidence for the some queens of the Fifth and Sixth Dynasties.

Touching History: 3D Replicas - 3D printing introduced by John Kaufmann.

Senusret III: Legendary Pharaoh - Raymond Betz takes readers on a tour of an exhibition at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Lille.

Per Mesut: for Younger Readers - Hilary Wilson on Linen in ancient Egypt.

Mummification: all heart, no brain?   Sofia Aziz looks at why the ancient Egyptians discarded the brains of mummies.

The Pharaohs and the Mercenary King - The King of Sparta helped Thirtieth Dynasty pharaohs defeat Persia says Erich B. Anderson.

Obelisks and the Expansive Splitting of Granite - Allan Mills presents his contoversial theory.

 

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